In so many individual and group journeys that took place over the years, three questions were continually asked. The goal was to be open to any possible answer that comes up without filtering them with our usual assumptions.

 

In so many individual and group journeys that took place over the years, three questions were continually asked. The goal was to be open to any possible answer that comes up without filtering them with our usual assumptions.

What is healing?

Why does it happen?

Why does it seem to happen to some people and not to others?

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The answers were documented loosely and came into observation during the
consequent intensive workshops that took place in various parts of the world.

One answer particularly stood out during a Southeast Asia trip that laced group processes
that took place in Hong Kong, Singapore, Malaysia and Indonesia in September 2014.
At that time, there was a particular concern at how many beginner workshop
attendees sometimes get stuck while attending a healing workshop simply
because they wanted to experience what it meant to feel better.

Holding this internal query in place, Pi was giving a Transformation Medicine talk in a center in
Kuala Lumpur a week later when he watched himself spontaneously utter the following words:

“The moment we want to heal is the very moment we don’t.”

“The moment we want to heal is the very moment we don’t.”

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It was quite dramatic to see a room crammed with healers, cancer patients and the like suddenly taken aback. The air was stilled by the momentary mystery. We could literally feel the mental struggle that arises whenever we are asked to regard a paradoxical truth. Yet, because of the room’s openness, there was a resigned recognition mixed in with that struggle. Beside some puzzled faces, there were heads nodding with slight apprehension.

 


We decided to stick with this statement, opening the next workshops we held in other centers, homes and yoga places, closing the tour in Ubud, Bali, where we held a three-day intensive with an advanced group of seekers, some of whom we have seen in other parts of the world in past years.

Whenever the opportunity arises to hold transformation work in a multi-cultural milieu, such as in Bali where a training might see a healthy mixture of Europeans, North and South Americans, and Asians, the answers to the questions being asked are clear as they are not.  It takes days or even months to unfold the amount of information that comes into observation from so many different lens.

I was taken aback at the depth of pilgrimage a modern spiritual hub such as Ubud magnetizes. The same takes place in my Bahay Kalipay Retreat Center in Palawan in a much quieter way. In the Ubud training I co-facilitated with the gifted intuitive called Amara Samata, I witnessed a coming together of the many representations of healing I have been observing around the world, all in one place.

Throughout this process, we have had a chance to watch the vast differences in the dynamics between pilgrims who were constantly searching for answers outside and people who were finding the answers from within. I mention Amara here for the reason that her life and work unfolds an incredibly rich tapestry of the stories of awakening inwards. From the inner dance awakening that catapulted her from the dark night of the soul into a long period of experience of “unbearable bliss,” she now holds the same process reflexively for those who visit her Inner Guidance Institute in Ubud, Bali. This is part of her story.


She walked into the room full of the Letting Go.

It was in a Singapore studio called Wasabi Yoga. Amara had been in a sleepless release for weeks now.

From 2009 onwards, I watched a teacher emerge from her own ashes. Every year I re-entered Singapore, I saw how conscious wisdom does awaken from nothing.

Amara’s words reflect the ongoing illumination of the consciousness in us all, experiencing itself through one person’s eye, as it expands tomorrow into something else that doesn’t look like what it was yesterday.


 

“There’s a system that comes up.”

The following video talks about the voice of the heart.  It talks about one woman’s journey into her own wisdom, as Amara’s own healing resonance creates the conditions for another to find her own.

Often, resonance begins with the simplest state of love and trust. When we let go of what is not loving nor trusting, our own system arises.  A system of clear knowing, spontaneous moving, confident feeling, unattached earthing, and in this video, an empowered expression of self.

In our work in Malaysia, women heal when given the freedom to voice their heart. In an environment where they are not always able to do so. In other cultures, the system that comes up may exhibit itself in a vastly different way. It doesn’t matter how it comes up.  When we release old patterns of judgment, resistance and attachments, one of the most common denominators is based on, “at this moment, it doesn’t really matter what other people think.  I detach myself from the expectations and the control that other people have over me.”

In healing process, we simply call this, the cutting of cords. When we find ways to halt the systems of interpretation streaming information into us from external sources that do not serve our heart’s truth, healing happens. Transformation comes about. Change takes place in a sustained and accelerated pace.